So Happy - Gunner Forum
Gunner Forum

So Happy

This is a discussion on So Happy within the Ammunition forums, part of the Gunner Forum category; After getting sick with the flu, I lost interest in spending time reloading. As a matter of fact I had set aside reloading for too ...


Go Back   Gunner Forum > Gunner Forum > Ammunition

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-10-2016, 03:44 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
KimberLover's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2013
From: Winston Salem, NC
Posts: 1,142
So Happy

After getting sick with the flu, I lost interest in spending time reloading.
As a matter of fact I had set aside reloading for too long.
I had a ton of equipment and supplies.
My shooting buddy is a few years younger than me and I watched as he made several mistakes as he reloaded.
I spent some time this week thinking about my age and wondering if I too could make those mistakes.
My wife said why worry, sell your equipment and just buy your bullets. Besides you have enough to last a life time.
So, yesterday I let a local gunsmith have the entire lot for a bargain price. He was happy to get the Lee pro 1000 and I was glad he took it.
So I am "Happy, happy, happy!
KimberLover is offline  
Register

Welcome to Gunner Forum - a friendly gun forum for gun owners.

We welcome everyone and the community is free to join so register today and become part of the Gunner Forum family!

Old 03-10-2016, 06:56 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jan 2013
From: northern wisconsin
Posts: 5,997
Makes sense to me, KL. I think you reach a point where time spent reloading becomes a major issue and by time I mean quality time with no interruptions, the kind of time you must have for loading. That's a rare thing for me with our always busy schedule, not to mention the fact that loading seriously cuts into my all important shooting time, especially my air gun shooting, which I do on a daily basis at home.

We recently sold off the bulk of our reloading equipment and supplies, too, along with guns and cartridges that we really didn't need for our shooting. We kept one basic press and will only be reloading 357/38s and, maybe, 223 though factory ammo for 223 is so cheap it gets hard to justify taking the time to reload it. Other than our 327, those are the only two centerfire cartridges we now shoot. (The 327 may yet get purged, though I do love the gun).
north country gal is offline  
Old 03-10-2016, 07:55 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
tx gun runner's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
From: Ft Hood , Tx area
Posts: 11,626
The only factory ammo I buy and shoot is the 40SW . The 40SW is like the 38 super which works on a super high pressure in a small volume case . With near max loads [ over 35,000 psi ] and seat a bullet .010 too deep or a 2 tenth grain of too much powder can double the psi from 35,000 to 70,000 . A large volume case like a 357 or 44 mag that work on 35,000 psi too , so a bullet seated .010 too deep or 2 tenth grain of too much powder is very forgiving and will not double the psi like in a Small volume case . I don't do high volume reloading . I make custom ammo only since 1968 and no factory ammo can match or beat my ammo I make . This is a very short version about PSI in ammo , I hope this makes sense and it is not intended to be gospel and you need to read up more on the subject before making ammo .

Last edited by tx gun runner; 03-10-2016 at 07:57 AM.
tx gun runner is offline  
 
Old 03-10-2016, 08:29 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
bearcatter's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2015
From: Virginia
Posts: 3,852
I shoot a few hundred .38s a year, and the rest is .22. I could get a simple setup to load .38 and likely save a little in the long run, but not enough to bother.
bearcatter is offline  
Old 03-10-2016, 09:56 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
tx gun runner's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
From: Ft Hood , Tx area
Posts: 11,626
Quote:
Originally Posted by bearcatter View Post
I shoot a few hundred .38s a year, and the rest is .22. I could get a simple setup to load .38 and likely save a little in the long run, but not enough to bother.
When I did the combat type matches in Ca for 10 yrs with my 1911, between practice and matches I loaded over 1,000 a month . I did the Cowboy Action shooting for over 16 yrs and with practice and matches , I shot over 1,000 rds a month also . I can't now or then afford to buy 1,000 rds or 20 boxes of ammo a month . I also did the pistol and rifle silhouette matches too . Plus you can't buy the quality custom ammo I make for the different matches and guns .
tx gun runner is offline  
Old 03-10-2016, 10:37 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jun 2015
From: High Desert of South Arizona
Posts: 863
I've never really trusted myself to reload, so I've never done it. Not to mention being far too lazy. Just sold enough .357 and .38 brass to make a viable reloading operation. (1000 pc for $ 80) That's about 6 times the scrap price, so I was glad to get it.
Shakyshoot is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 04:25 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
KimberLover's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2013
From: Winston Salem, NC
Posts: 1,142
I appreciate the comments and understanding.
The over seating (as TGR says) was of great concern to me.
To put forth an example of that problem, I noticed several time when shooting 38's the recoil was often greater from one shot to the next.
That really got my attention.
I could reload a 38 for nineteen cents which was about one half the LGS price.
However, the potential of having a 357 blow apart in my hand was not to my liking.
I might add a little caution to this post, so here goes.
An old time shooting buddy bought a 44 magnum.
While in the store he asked for a box of 44 magnums.
The clerk looked around and came up with a box. He dusted the dust off the box and gave them to buddy.
So, he is banging away and all of a sudden he fires one round that does not exit the barrel.
He attempts to cock the S&W an the cylinder would not turn.(Lucky is not the word), so he tries to open the cylinder and it would not budge.
The range owner helped him drive the bullet back into the cylinder and he goes back to shooting.
Then it happens again,
By now he is really concerned as he finds that both cases had split down the side which turned out to be the problem.
By that time he had shot nearly all of the box so he quit.
To this day no one knows what the problem came from as the shells were factory ammo.
He quit shooting after that as his health is failing.
KimberLover is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 05:14 AM   #8
Super Moderator
 
Terry_P's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
From: Where it's warm
Posts: 10,341
I load every center fire round I shoot or carry. It's a decision we all must make. If you don't enjoy it (anymore) or trust your accuracy then it is time to let the factories make it for you. When I load I don't load more than 50 rounds at a sitting so I'm not trying to hurry.
Terry_P is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 06:16 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
tx gun runner's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
From: Ft Hood , Tx area
Posts: 11,626
You must reload every cal different .380, 9MM , 40SW and 45ACP all must loaded different because there are bottom feeders and have different problems . The same with 32-20 , 38 , 357 mag , 44 mag , 38-40 and 44-40 and load different and have different problems in wheel guns . I don't like the word reloading . Personally I only make custom made ammo for the type of shooting I'm doing . My target , defense and hunting are all different . Even the type of bullets I use are different for target , defense and hunting are all different . You can't buy better ammo then I make and it is 1/3 the cost of factory ammo . I've had 4 different type of progressive presses and when back to the single stage press because you can't do everything on a progressive I do . Brass preparation is super important to me plus I can feel and control my ammo much better in a single stage press . .
tx gun runner is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 07:21 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jan 2013
From: northern wisconsin
Posts: 5,997
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimberLover View Post
... I might add a little caution to this post, so here goes.
An old time shooting buddy bought a 44 magnum.
While in the store he asked for a box of 44 magnums.
The clerk looked around and came up with a box. He dusted the dust off the box and gave them to buddy.
So, he is banging away and all of a sudden he fires one round that does not exit the barrel.
He attempts to cock the S&W an the cylinder would not turn.(Lucky is not the word), so he tries to open the cylinder and it would not budge.
The range owner helped him drive the bullet back into the cylinder and he goes back to shooting.
Then it happens again,
By now he is really concerned as he finds that both cases had split down the side which turned out to be the problem.
By that time he had shot nearly all of the box so he quit.
To this day no one knows what the problem came from as the shells were factory ammo.
He quit shooting after that as his health is failing.
Always several possibilities. One is a gun that is slightly out of time and not aligning the cylinder up, properly, behind the forcing cone, causing the bullet to hang up just a bit in the forcing cone. Can also be an undersized forcing cone for the bullets you are shooting. Either situation can raise pressures enough to split brass and, in fact, is a sign that you might have such a problem. Has happened to me. Sounds very much like a timing issue on that one, though. Early S&W 44 mags often shot loose with a steady diet of full power 44 mags and needed to be sent back to the factory to be re-timed. Starting in the late 80s, S&W beefed up their 44 mags. though.

Could also be ammo. As good as factory ammo is, there is still a chance of a bad load. It happens.

My reloading has always been very much like TGR's. Never owned a progressive loader in my life. Just too much of a perfectionist at the loading bench. That's why it has always been so darn time consuming.

Last edited by north country gal; 03-11-2016 at 07:26 AM.
north country gal is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 08:31 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
303Lithgow's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2012
From: Washington State
Posts: 16,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakyshoot View Post
I've never really trusted myself to reload, so I've never done it. Not to mention being far too lazy. Just sold enough .357 and .38 brass to make a viable reloading operation. (1000 pc for $ 80) That's about 6 times the scrap price, so I was glad to get it.
The secret is no interruptions and total concentrations. Especially with a progressive press.
303Lithgow is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 08:44 AM   #12
Super Moderator
 
Terry_P's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
From: Where it's warm
Posts: 10,341
I inherited a Rockchucker from my dad 21 years ago (I have no idea how long he had it for??) and that is all I own and use. Case prep is important and I weigh every charge. I have a Chargemaster system whereby the RCBS 1500 digital scale is docked into the electronic powder drop system and it drops as exact a charge as I can. I drop one while I'm seating and crimping the prior drop. It works for me.
Terry_P is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 10:27 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
303Lithgow's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2012
From: Washington State
Posts: 16,373
I have found that a rhythm of working the handle on a progressive press is also important. Especially for the powder portion of loading. An even stroke with the same light bump at the end of each cycle works best for me. I would load up enough raw materials to do 50 rounds (depending on caliber) and do all 50 at once. Restock the press, take a minute break and then do another 50.

I love listening to baseball on the radio while cleaning firearms but would not do so while reloading.
303Lithgow is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 01:13 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
tx gun runner's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
From: Ft Hood , Tx area
Posts: 11,626
I've watch or listen to TV when reloading for over 50 yrs . I do my reloading in stages . one night I size all my brass , then I clean pocket another time , then bell them out another time . When the brass is completed to my satisfaction , then I seat all my primers another night to get them ready for reloading . When the brass completed and primed I do the next 5 steps in 1 operation in like in the pic in 1 movement .. Then another night I crimp my brass after the bullets are competed loaded because I like to feel the crimp as it goes on and if it don't feel correct I put it aside and check why later . That is a lot of work but they are perfect when I'm done .


tx gun runner is offline  
Old 03-11-2016, 07:42 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
moakes58's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2014
From: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 4,728
I load all of our .380 & .45 acp, as well as 9mm. All done single stage in batches.
I deprime 1st. with a Universal decapper.
I then clean the brass with a vinigar soak followed by an ultrasonic cleaner.

I then resize everything & then flare & prime in 1 step. I try to keep 200 to 300 cases ready to load in each caliber.
When I charge & seat the bullet, I do 50 at a time, loading all cases with powder & then checking all with a light, then seat the bullets in the block of 50.

My system works well for me & I enjoy the process. The components cost is about $7.50 per 50 rounds. There is no better feeling than loading my 1911 with my ammo & taking that bullseye out!
moakes58 is offline  
Old 03-12-2016, 03:53 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
KimberLover's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2013
From: Winston Salem, NC
Posts: 1,142
I am sure you all know the best way to reload that suits your preference.
When I used a single step loader I was successful at making good reloads.
I traded the single step loader for the Lee 1000 progressive loader.
I'm nearing 74 now and find myself making too many mistakes.
Sometimes I feel like a 10 year old walking around in a worn out body. Meaning
I was worked like a borrowed mule when I was young. Maybe that led to me being a workaholic up until a few years ago.
Many things can lead up to loosing your ability to function. Open heart surgery, two stents, back surgery, rotator surgery and foot surgery. Believe you me it slows you down. The back surgery was no help and I often make missteps that lead to bumping into door frames and staggering when the back grabs me.
I cannot tell you how some normal functions are so hard to preform now.
Oh well, you will all be there someday.
I count my blessings as the doctors that extended my life are precious to me and I think the world of them.
No one told me that working 16 hours a day would eventually catch up to me, but I am the one that did it to myself.

Last edited by KimberLover; 03-12-2016 at 05:51 AM.
KimberLover is offline  
Reply

  Gunner Forum > Gunner Forum > Ammunition


Search tags for this page

happy gunner ammo

Click on a term to search for related topics.

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Gunner Forum Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Happy Happy Happy ermad Range Reports 7 03-04-2015 05:09 PM


Top Gun Sites Top Sites List


Powered by vBulletin 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 2008-2012 Gunner Forum. All rights reserved.