Rifle Stock Busted - Gunner Forum
Gunner Forum

Rifle Stock Busted

This is a discussion on Rifle Stock Busted within the Lever Action Rifles forums, part of the Long Gun Forum category; Good grief. I was showing off my rifle collection to my brother-in-law yesterday and discovered my 1873 Winchester replica (made by Uberti, sold by Cimarron) ...


Go Back   Gunner Forum > Long Gun Forum > Lever Action Rifles

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-17-2014, 10:21 AM   #1
Member
 
Pallidin's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Escondido, CA
Posts: 36
Rifle Stock Busted

Good grief. I was showing off my rifle collection to my brother-in-law yesterday and discovered my 1873 Winchester replica (made by Uberti, sold by Cimarron) was cracked almost completely around the circumference of the buttstock's wrist. And this wasn't a hairline crack......it was about a 1/4"wide. Well, I was very surprised because I handled the gun just a week ago when I wiped it down with CLP as I do with all my guns periodically. It was fine then but now it looked as if it had exploded from the inside.

I removed the screws from the top and bottom tang, which is right where the break has occurred, and then the pieces separated completely. There are no splinters and I can join the two halves and there is no sign of a crack if I hold them tightly together.

So, I'm guessing something happened somewhere in time to cause this but have no clue what it could be. I went online to the Cimarron Arm's company and found they have a replacement stock for $350. I'd probably have to get the fore-end stock piece too just to improve the chances of them matching in grain and color......that's another $150.00.

That's $500 for a rifle that cost me $1000.00. Now I'm wondering if I can have it repaired for substantially less. I've Googled for repair info and that option isn't looking any cheaper. Anyone here had any success with a do-it-yourself repair of this magnitude?

I'm open to consider any suggestions.

Thanks.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg P1030035_resize.JPG (198.4 KB, 21 views)
File Type: jpg P1030032_resize.JPG (244.2 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg P1030036_resize.JPG (224.9 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg P1030026_resize.JPG (189.4 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg P1030027_resize.JPG (164.5 KB, 20 views)
Pallidin is offline  
Register

Welcome to Gunner Forum - a friendly gun forum for gun owners.

We welcome everyone and the community is free to join so register today and become part of the Gunner Forum family!

Old 03-17-2014, 10:46 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Agonnazar's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2014
From: Deltona, FL
Posts: 140
You probably could drill and dowel and glue it back together, but it would be a lot of precision work. Just gluing it probably wouldn't work, as I don't think you could clamp it properly. The dowels would allow you to clamp it and keep your lines the way they should be. Bad thing is, if you are off even a hair on the dowels, it'll show.

I'm very interested to hear what others have to say though. My first impression is that it's going to be expensive.
Agonnazar is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 11:05 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
303Lithgow's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2012
From: Washington State
Posts: 16,373
Sorry about your stock Mac. The thing that comes to my mind is the grain is running the wrong way. Shouldn't it run the length and not the width?
303Lithgow is offline  
 
Old 03-17-2014, 11:18 AM   #4
Member
 
Pallidin's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Escondido, CA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agonnazar View Post
You probably could drill and dowel and glue it back together, but it would be a lot of precision work. Just gluing it probably wouldn't work, as I don't think you could clamp it properly. The dowels would allow you to clamp it and keep your lines the way they should be. Bad thing is, if you are off even a hair on the dowels, it'll show.

I'm very interested to hear what others have to say though. My first impression is that it's going to be expensive.
I agree that dowels or pins of some sort, as well as a super duper adhesive, will be necessary based on my meager understanding of such repairs. I've sent off an Email to a place in Wyoming(stockfixrs.com) that does such repairs hoping to get a reply with some positive and not so expensive news.

Thanks.
Pallidin is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 11:26 AM   #5
Member
 
Pallidin's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Escondido, CA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by 303Lithgow View Post
Sorry about your stock Mac. The thing that comes to my mind is the grain is running the wrong way. Shouldn't it run the length and not the width?
I've pondered your reply and think I know what you mean.....maybe. Do you mean that the stock may have failed at this weak point because the wood grain direction of this particular stock isn't ideal for strength at that wrist area.....? Looking at the pictures it does appear that the grain is running side to side rather than front to back. You might be onto something there.
Pallidin is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 11:32 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
KimberLover's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2013
From: Winston Salem, NC
Posts: 1,142
I think you should direct this to the seller of the Uberti product.
That was definitely a faulty stock and should have been rejected by the maker.
KimberLover is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 11:49 AM   #7
Member
 
Pallidin's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Escondido, CA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimberLover View Post
I think you should direct this to the seller of the Uberti product.
That was definitely a faulty stock and should have been rejected by the maker.
I agree and I did send a lengthy Email explaining the situation to Cimarron yesterday. No reply from them yet. Although this rifle looks brand new it's probably ten years old. I bought it from the original owner 5 or 6 years ago. I will be surprised if I get a reply offering me anything more than the time of day. If I were them I wouldn't be tripping over myself trying to do the right thing over a rifle that could have been abused in God only knows what ways over a ten year period. But it's fun to dream about them asking if they can please fix it free of charge.
Pallidin is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 11:57 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Machinist's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
From: McKinney, TX
Posts: 8,994
Sorry to see this. What a beautiful stock, too. I agree the grain seems wrong. I hope they see it this way and make it right.

303, thanks but it's not me. I gave him my avatar as it fit his name. Sorry for the confusion.
Machinist is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 01:53 PM   #9
Super Moderator
 
RetiredSeabee's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
From: Harrisburg, North Carolina
Posts: 4,267
What a shame that it broke. But the grain is definitely running the wrong way. That piece of wood should never have been cut into a stock. Hope the Manufacturer come through for you.
RetiredSeabee is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 03:40 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
gunjunkie's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2014
From: Texas Panhandle.
Posts: 3,787
Yall are right that the grain should run up and down. That's the way my Grandpa taught me to pick out hammer handles. I hope they replace it, but I wouldn't count on it. I would go ahead and glue it. You don't need any high dollar glue, just some milk based carpenter's glue like Elmer's. If you can make some kind of jig to allow you to clamp it, the joint will be stronger than the wood around it.
gunjunkie is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 05:07 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
303Lithgow's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2012
From: Washington State
Posts: 16,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Machinist View Post
Sorry to see this. What a beautiful stock, too. I agree the grain seems wrong. I hope they see it this way and make it right.

303, thanks but it's not me. I gave him my avatar as it fit his name. Sorry for the confusion.
Wow I though it was yours.
303Lithgow is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 05:13 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Machinist's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
From: McKinney, TX
Posts: 8,994
I would be crying. That's a nice looking stock.
Machinist is offline  
Old 03-17-2014, 06:18 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
tx gun runner's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
From: Ft Hood , Tx area
Posts: 11,626
I've repaired over 10 stocks broken that way . I drill a 1/4" holes in both halves 1" deep on the inside not to be seen when halves are put together . Fill the holes with Marine-tex like JB weld then quickly using wood glue the 2 halves and clamp together and let bond for 10 hrs . Then I drill the mounting hole out and epoxy a alum sleeve in wood . If you do it right you never see the repair and you wouldn't need to refinish the wood .
tx gun runner is offline  
Old 03-18-2014, 06:07 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Joined: Jan 2013
From: northern wisconsin
Posts: 5,997
My biggest problem with a repair job, no matter how good, would be trusting it. I'd always be nervous about the stock breaking, again, even though I know that the right repair would actually make it stronger than the original. Just not conducive to peace of mind for me. As mentioned, first step would be to contact Uberti and see what they say.
north country gal is offline  
Old 03-19-2014, 09:37 AM   #15
Member
 
Pallidin's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Escondido, CA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by tx gun runner View Post
I've repaired over 10 stocks broken that way . I drill a 1/4" holes in both halves 1" deep on the inside not to be seen when halves are put together . Fill the holes with Marine-tex like JB weld then quickly using wood glue the 2 halves and clamp together and let bond for 10 hrs . Then I drill the mounting hole out and epoxy a alum sleeve in wood . If you do it right you never see the repair and you wouldn't need to refinish the wood .
After getting the brush off by Cimarron's gunsmith, to whom they refer any and all problems, I've been researching repair methods and have decided to attempt it myself. The gunsmith wants $450 to put a new stock on the rifle(warranty is just one year to original owner and I'm not the original owner) but that amount really galls me.
I've got nothing to lose by doing as you suggest. Do I understand right that you don't use any metal or wooden pins?

Thanks,

VR

PS And by the way......Cimarron's gunsmith agreed with everyone that said the grain wasn't in the right direction. .....and I quote.... "It does look like the grain might not have been selected very well when the rifle was built. Because you are not the original owner and the gun is over 1 year old, it is no longer covered by Cimarron's warranty service. I can replace the stock for you and I would be happy to give you a quote if you'd like.

Please know that I am a separate company than Cimarron and I do not set their warranty policies."
Pallidin is offline  
Old 03-19-2014, 09:56 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
KS95B40's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Kansas
Posts: 519
You might want to consider these guys.

http://www.precisiongunstocks.com/co...en-us/d11.html

$75 for a semi- inletted buttstock. If you don't want to finish it yourself, a local smith might do it for you.
KS95B40 is offline  
Old 03-19-2014, 10:12 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
gunjunkie's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2014
From: Texas Panhandle.
Posts: 3,787
Quote:
Originally Posted by KS95B40 View Post
You might want to consider these guys.

http://www.precisiongunstocks.com/co...en-us/d11.html

$75 for a semi- inletted buttstock. If you don't want to finish it yourself, a local smith might do it for you.
I bought one of their stocks for my Grandpa's 101 year old Remington model 14. I haven't started on it yet, but it's at least 3/16" oversized at the inlet, and more than a 1/4" oversized on the rest of it. It will take a lot of filing. I asked him in the note area, when I ordered it, if he would throw in a couple of scrap pieces of wood so I could practice matching the finish to the foregrip. When I received it, he wrote on the packing slip that he didn't have any scraps. Seemed kind of odd to me that there wouldn't be any scraps laying around.
gunjunkie is offline  
Old 03-19-2014, 10:30 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
KS95B40's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Kansas
Posts: 519
I have no personal experience with this company, I just thought for $75 it was worth trying. Besides being really oversized, how was the quality of the wood?

I have thought about buying a Stock from them for my No1 Rolling Block.
KS95B40 is offline  
Old 03-19-2014, 10:54 AM   #19
Member
 
Pallidin's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Escondido, CA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by KS95B40 View Post
You might want to consider these guys.

http://www.precisiongunstocks.com/co...en-us/d11.html

$75 for a semi- inletted buttstock. If you don't want to finish it yourself, a local smith might do it for you.
Thanks for the link. I looked it over and found two unfortunate items of interest. First the pistol grip stock for an 1873 is, "Currently Not Available" and second, "Some manufacturers are currently producing replicas of original Winchester rifles. For the most part, our original Winchester stocks are not interchangeable with these newer replica stocks. Some of our stocks can be made to work, such as the 1876 Winchester on the 1876 Chaparral, but they do require more time, effort, and knowledge to obtain a satisfactory fit. We do NOT recommend purchasing one of our stocks for a current manufacture rifle unless you are experienced in stock fitting and are prepared to invest a goodly amount of time and, possibly, money."

So, I definitely will keep them in the back of my mind if my results with do-it-yourself repair suck. Their price for a pistol grip stock, if they had any, is only $85.00 and $55 for a matching fore-end. I like those numbers but their warning cited above isn't very encouraging. Thanks again.
Pallidin is offline  
Old 03-19-2014, 12:04 PM   #20
Member
 
Pallidin's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Escondido, CA
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by gunjunkie View Post
Yall are right that the grain should run up and down. That's the way my Grandpa taught me to pick out hammer handles. I hope they replace it, but I wouldn't count on it. I would go ahead and glue it. You don't need any high dollar glue, just some milk based carpenter's glue like Elmer's. If you can make some kind of jig to allow you to clamp it, the joint will be stronger than the wood around it.
Yup, I didn't seriously expect anyone to say, 'Hey, let's do the right thing here and immediately ship him a new set of stocks free of charge!" I know it's na´ve but even in my old age I keep hoping to encounter someone like that. Why doesn't Cimarron realize that they would get some serious, powerful and positive advertising about their products in return for what is to them just a few bucks worth of wood. Oh no, let's hold the customer up for every buck we can. Very shortsighted in my opinion. Had they even tried to give me a discount of some sort I'd be happy and sing their praises to whomever in my circle of friends might be interested. Nope, ain't gonna happen. Instead, they'll have a disgruntled old man calling them names, justified or not......and I know quite a few guys who spend money on fancy old west replicas like I have......but I'll be certain to tell them what to expect from Cimarron after the one year warranty is over, defect or not.

Regarding a jig to apply pressure I think I'll have to resort to duct tape going round and round length wise considering how this is busted. As to glue I'm thinking you are right that Elmer's Wood glue is probably as good as anything more exotic, at least for the break surfaces. If I install metal pins I'll probably be best served there by an epoxy of some sort. I've read that something called Acragel glass, or is it Acraglass Gel.....some such name...... is a popular epoxy for pinning.

Thanks.

PS I've been doing lots of reading about wood adhesives and noted several times that the fact that the glue claims to be stronger than the wood is somewhat misleading......yes, it's stronger, but the wood adjacent to the glue is still just as prone to breaking as it was before. That's why I'm still thinking I'll need to pin this sucker somehow to give it a chance to survive.

Last edited by Pallidin; 03-19-2014 at 12:26 PM.
Pallidin is offline  
Reply

  Gunner Forum > Long Gun Forum > Lever Action Rifles


Search tags for this page

how to put a steel pin in a seam crack of a rifle stock

Click on a term to search for related topics.

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Gunner Forum Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
AK stock.. JOHNNY WACKO Gun Gear 1 04-29-2010 04:55 PM
Stock #7 in 308 JOHNNY WACKO Gun Pictures 9 08-20-2009 05:29 AM
38s in stock XLCH Ammunition 3 06-12-2009 04:00 PM
Busted resizing die Bountyhunter Reloading 20 02-09-2009 10:57 PM


Top Gun Sites Top Sites List


Powered by vBulletin 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 2008-2012 Gunner Forum. All rights reserved.